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    Source Code Protective Orders, From the Perspective of a Source Code Examiner
    This is the first in a group of articles on source code and how it is handled, examined, and analyzed in litigation. This article covers source code protective orders, which outline restrictions on source code access.
    Diving into Code Quality: Measuring Code Quality
    Read about the tools and techniques utilized by experts to measure code quality.
    Diving Into Code Quality: Factors Affecting Code Quality
    Read about why high code quality matters, and learn about what factors directly affect code quality.
    Supreme Court Resolves Circuit Split on Copyright Registration
    On March 4, 2019, the Supreme Court of the United States in Fourth Estate Public Benefit Corp. v. Wall-Street.com, LLC unanimously held that the U.S. Copyright Office must issue a copyright registration prior to a copyright claimant filing a lawsuit alleging infringement.
    Examining and Protecting Trade Secrets in IT Litigation
    DisputeSoft's Jeff Parmet and Tom Ashley discuss the issues a software expert must address when supporting litigation in which trade secrets are involved.
    Electronic Medical Records and Litigation
    Read G. Hunter Jones' review of “Electronic Medical Records and Litigation," a reference and practice manual valuable for both attorneys and forensic experts involved in medical malpractice litigation.
    Patent Litigation Part Six: An Introduction to Patent Claims, “Limitations,” Infringement, and Invalidity
    This six and final installment of Andrew Schulman's patent litigation series covers the Local Patent Rules that govern infringement and invalidity litigation, as well as the use of claim charts to map limitations to claims.
    Patent Litigation Part Five: An Introduction to Patent Claims, “Limitations,” Infringement, and Invalidity
    This fifth installment of Andrew Schulman's six-part patent litigation series examines the concept of patent invalidity and explores several ways in which patent claims can be invalidated.
    Patent Litigation Part Four: An Introduction to Patent Claims, “Limitations,” Infringement, and Invalidity
    This fourth installment of Andrew Schulman's six-part patent litigation series walks readers through a limitation-by limitation comparison of a facade-server patent claim with a hypothetical accused product to investigate possible infringement.
    Patent Litigation Part Three: An Introduction to Patent Claims, “Limitations,” Infringement, and Invalidity
    This third installment of Andrew Schulman's six-part patent litigation series describes the process of using a patent claim as a checklist to investigate patent infringement.
    Patent Litigation Part Two: An Introduction to Patent Claims, “Limitations,” Infringement, and Invalidity
    This second installment of Andrew Schulman's six-part patent litigation series draws on a simple claim for printer toner to illustrate the role of patent claims "as devices for testing patent infringement and invalidity.”
    Patent Litigation Part One: An Introduction to Patent Claims, “Limitations,” Infringement, and Invalidity
    This first installment of Andrew Schulman's six-part patent litigation series explores the idea that a patent is not self-enforcing but rather requires its owner to protect it through litigation.
    Oracle v. Google Update: Federal Circuit Reverses on Fair Use 
    In March 2018, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit found that Google’s use of 37 Java API packages in the Android smartphone software platform was not fair use.
    Applying the AFC Test: What the AFC Test Reveals
    This second installment in DisputeSoft's Applying the AFC Test series considers the ability of the AFC Test to reveal hidden similarities in the structure, sequence, and organization of two programs.
    Applying the AFC Test: When to Apply the AFC test
    This third installment in DisputeSoft's Applying the AFC Test series considers the sorts of disputes for which experts may apply the AFC Test.
    Applying the AFC Test: What is the AFC Test?
    This first installment in DisputeSoft's Applying the AFC Test series introduces the AFC Test as a methodology for assessing whether non-literal elements of a program were copied for use in another program.
    Source Code Repositories: Authenticating Production of Source Code
    This installment of DisputeSoft's Source Code Repositories series considers why source code repositories are the best evidence an expert can be provided for the purpose of authenticating source code production.
    Source Code Repositories: Reviewing the Right Version of a Program
    This installment of DisputeSoft's Source Code Repositories series considers why source code repositories are useful for ensuring that an expert reviews the right version of a disputed program.
    Source Code Repositories: What is a Source Code Repository?
    This installment of DisputeSoft's Source Code Repositories series introduces readers to what source code repositories are and why software developers use them.
    What Every Attorney Needs to Know About Computer Forensics: Changes to the System Clock, Windows Event Logs, and Proving Spoliation
    This installment of DisputeSoft's Computer Forensics series considers how experts can establish or refute inferences of spoliation by examining Windows Event Logs.
    Warner Bros. Mistake Highlights Opportunity for DMCA Improvement
    DisputeSoft considers the DMCA's failure to substantially reduce online piracy, as well as the US Copyright Office's response to calls to revise the law.
    What Every Medical Malpractice Attorney Needs To Know About Computer Forensics
    This installment of DisputeSoft's Computer Forensics series sheds light on how a computer forensics expert can uncover factual information that exposes medical mistakes or cover-ups.
    Practical Advice to Beat Piracy
    DisputeSoft's Jeff Parmet, Tom Ashley, and Nick Ferrara offer a brief overview of techniques DisputesSoft has used to lay the necessary evidentiary foundation to support misappropriation and infringement claims relating to online piracy.
    What Every Attorney Needs to Know about Computer Forensics, Part 4: What Trusts and Estates Attorneys Need to Know about Computer Forensics
    This installment of DisputeSoft's Computer Forensics series considers how a computer forensics expert can help in the unfortunate event that a dispute arises among potential beneficiaries during the transfer of a loved one's assets.
    Computer Fraud and Abuse – United States v. Nosal; Facebook v. Vachani
    DisputeSoft examines two cases out of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals which decided issues related to the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) and “access without authorization.”
    What Every Attorney Needs to Know about Computer Forensics, Part 3: What Criminal Defense Attorneys Need to Know about Computer Forensics
    This installment of DisputeSoft's Computer Forensics series considers the role of a computer forensics expert in establishing essential information about a defendant's activities and location at an important date and time.
    Oracle v. Google Update: Ninth Circuit Declares Google’s Actions Fair Use
    DisputeSoft considers a California District Court's decision that Google's use of Oracle's Java APIs in the creation of Android was fair use.
    What Every Attorney Needs to Know about Computer Forensics, Part 2: The Difference between Electronic Discovery and Computer Forensics
    This installment of DisputeSoft's Computer Forensics series breaks down the differences and intersections between Computer Forensics and Electronic Discovery.
    What Every Attorney Needs to Know about Computer Forensics, Part 1: What is Computer Forensics?
    This installment of DisputeSoft's Computer Forensics series introduces readers to the field of Computer Forensics and the use of forensic evidence in litigation.
    Not Being Kathleen Sebelius: Minimizing Risk in High-Risk, High-Stakes Technology Projects
    DisputeSoft's Allen Klein and Anne Ackerman examine the lessons that sponsors developing and implementing complex systems and seeking to minimize project risk can learn from the failure of the federal healthcare exchange.
    Federal District Court Holds that Party Alleging Software Copyright Infringement Must Have Preserved an Intact and Original Version of its Source Code to Withstand Summary Judgment
    This article examines the essential role DisputeSoft's expert analysis and Jeff Parmet's expert testimony played in the InDyne v. Abacus matter.
    Challenging The Validity Of Software Copyright Registrations: The Deposit Copy Requirement
    DisputeSoft's Jeff Parmet and Brendan McParland consider methods for assessing whether a deposit copy is proper in the context of software copyright registrations.